Field Tours & Socials

Field Tours

Field Tour #1 - Ochlawaha Bog

Southern Appalachian Bogs are a rare ecosystem, with only a few hundred acres thought to be remaining.  The Ochlawaha Bog was restored in 2011 from farmland just south of Asheville with the goal of re-creating seepage hydrology and habitat for the endangered bunched arrowhead plant, Sagittaria fasciculata) thought to only exist in two counties in the entire world. It is also the new home for over 30 species of game birds.   Join us for a tour of this 30 acre restoration and learn about what it takes to coordinate, design and implement this type of ecological restoration project. 

(Pictures sourced from https://www.fws.gov/southeast/tags/ochlawaha-bog/)

bunched-arrowhead-two-600x400.jpg
wood-duck-female-600x400.jpg

Field Tour #2 - Ochlawaha Bog

Southern Appalachian Bogs are a rare ecosystem, with only a few hundred acres thought to be remaining.  The Ochlawaha Bog was restored in 2011 from farmland just south of Asheville with the goal of re-creating seepage hydrology and habitat for the endangered bunched arrowhead plant, Sagittaria fasciculata) thought to only exist in two counties in the entire world.  It is also the new home for over 30 species of game birds.   Join us for a tour of this 30 acre restoration and learn about what it takes to coordinate, design and implement this type of ecological restoration project. 

(Pictures sourced from https://www.fws.gov/southeast/tags/ochlawaha-bog/)

bunched-arrowhead-two-600x400.jpg
wood-duck-female-600x400.jpg

Field Tour #3 - Ochlawaha Bog

Southern Appalachian Bogs are a rare ecosystem, with only a few hundred acres thought to be remaining.  The Ochlawaha Bog was restored in 2011 from farmland just south of Asheville with the goal of re-creating seepage hydrology and habitat for the endangered bunched arrowhead plant, Sagittaria fasciculata) thought to only exist in two counties in the entire world.  It is also the new home for over 30 species of game birds.   Join us for a tour of this 30 acre restoration and learn about what it takes to coordinate, design and implement this type of ecological restoration project. 

(Pictures sourced from https://www.fws.gov/southeast/tags/ochlawaha-bog/)

bunched-arrowhead-two-600x400.jpg
wood-duck-female-600x400.jpg

Field Tour #4 - Ochlawaha Bog

Southern Appalachian Bogs are a rare ecosystem, with only a few hundred acres thought to be remaining.  The Ochlawaha Bog was restored in 2011 from farmland just south of Asheville with the goal of re-creating seepage hydrology and habitat for the endangered bunched arrowhead plant, Sagittaria fasciculata) thought to only exist in two counties in the entire world.  It is also the new home for over 30 species of game birds.   Join us for a tour of this 30 acre restoration and learn about what it takes to coordinate, design and implement this type of ecological restoration project. 

(Pictures sourced from https://www.fws.gov/southeast/tags/ochlawaha-bog/)

bunched-arrowhead-two-600x400.jpg
wood-duck-female-600x400.jpg

Socials

Tuesday Social - Career Fair & Poster Presentations

Tuesday evening we are happy to host a poster presentation and career fair, courtesy of our Sponsors. If you are looking for a job or just interested with speaking with industry professionals about how to transition into that specific field, this is a social you are not going to want to miss. In addition, poster presentations will be taking place. Make sure to stop by these presentations to learn about the exciting things happening in ecological engineering. Hors d’oeuvre and a cash bar will be available for enjoyment.

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Wednesday Social - BBQ Dinner

After an afternoon of field tours, join us at Smoky Park Supper Club for BBQ, and games, and live music by Jesse Barry and the Jam. Challenge someone to a game of corn hole or just enjoy the view. A cash bar will be available for enjoyment. Live music provided by The Beutel Foundation for Sustainable Entertainment. (Pictures sourced from Smoky Park)

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